Posts Tagged ‘travel blogger’

Sapporo

Sapporo is to the west on the large island of Hokkaido. If you look at a map, it’s the bit of land that makes up the ‘head’ of Japan. This part hasn’t got the same sort of history as the rest of Japan because until the 1800s it was inhabited by the indigenous people, known as the Ainu or Aynu people, after which the Edo Shogunate took direct control.

Anyway all history aside I think I was mainly just pissed for the first 2 weeks. What a lovely time. These are the only pictures I managed to snap in Sapporo:

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Mario doing spins. (Not pictured: Wario and Luigi.)

Mario doing spins. (Not pictured: Wario and Luigi.)

Taken on a ferris wheel slap bang in the city centre.

Taken on a ferris wheel slap bang in the city centre.

Important beer sampling at the Sapporo beer factory.

Important beer sampling at the Sapporo beer factory.

 

Asahikawa

After Sapporo we moved on to Asahikawa where I begrudgingly entered my late-mid-twenties. ‘Kawa’ means ‘river’ in Japanese and Asahi is a brand of beer, so I had high hopes for this place.

Alas, no rivers of beer, but a lot of beer was certainly drunk. In Sapporo we at least made it outside to izakayahop, but here we were in such a lovely hotel we rarely made it outside. I saw my birthday in at out hotel’s rooftop bar, with Chris ordering a bottle of fine champagne at midnight (a decision we both regretted the next morning for separate reasons).

Happy birthday to meee!

Happy birthday to meee!

After sampling pretty much all alcohol within a 2 metre radius we thought it would be a FAB idea to rent out a karaoke booth, with a free beer tap inside. (And it was.)

We definitely got one word right.

We definitely got one word right.

Again, sorely lacking in photos, mainly due to consuming a little too much of the ol’ wobbly water – but we did finally venture outside of Hotel Paco, our eyes squinting at the sun like moles resurfacing after a long period underground.

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More incredibly important beer sampling.

Japanese gate known as a Torii (鳥居). Traditionally found at the entrance to a Shinto shrine, marking the transition into sacred land.

Japanese gate known as a Torii (鳥居). Traditionally found at the entrance to a Shinto shrine, marking the transition into sacred land.

Shinto worshippers write their prayers and wishes onto these small wooden blocks, known as Ema (絵馬), and leave them hanging in the shrine for the spirits.

Shinto worshippers write their prayers and wishes onto these small wooden blocks, known as Ema (絵馬), and leave them hanging in the shrine for the spirits.

Sacred rock. (At least I left the house.)

Sacred rock. (At least I left the house.)

We managed to shovel some food down in between drinking, which was nice. Japanese food is always nice actually. This time though we found an intriguing little alleyway and followed the lanterns to a Korean BBQ restaurant. If you haven’t been to one already, WHY THE HELL NOT? It’s amazing. Go.

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You get to cook your own meat so it’s done just how ya like. Not sure what makes this meat so much tastier than in other restaurants, but I like to think it’s because I cooked it myself. The dipping sauce that comes with it is DIVINE. So divine, in fact, that I’ve accidentally dipped my cooked meat in it after giving the raw meat a nice marinade bath on no less than 4 occasions.

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Furano

And now for something completely different; out of the city and up to the mountains. In season, Furano is a popular skiing destination. Off season it’s just a beautiful, quiet place to relax amongst the mountains, lakes and lavender fields . When Chris & I chose this destination we pictured hikes up the mountain followed by drinks at a local ski chalet bar in the evening, but as ever we chose the time of the year when everything is rainy and ~dead~. We did attempt a slog up the mountain on the first day but turned around within approximately 7 minutes, our shoes and socks saturated and umbrella threatening to Mary Poppins me away.

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The next day we did have some reprieve as the rain stopped long enough for us to walk to the Furano Winery and lavender fields. The winery itself was quite small but they offered us a few free thimbles of wine which made up for it. (If you hang back from the small group of people you can give yourself a cheeky top up – or so I’ve heard..) Just up the hill is the winery’s restaurant overlooking the town of Furano, where we ate steak and drank lavender wine.

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If you’re planning on visiting Furano I’d recommend going during ski season so there is more to do, bars that stay open past 8pm and possibly even contact with another human being. In all though, it was a lovely little break thoroughly enjoyed. (Apart from the lavender wine, that was cack.)

 

Otaru

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After Furano we head down to the romantic little port city of Otaru. The city faces Ishikari Bay, where the key ferry port is found. It’s not too modern (I struggled to find one of my beloved 7/11 kombinis here)  which I quite enjoyed; you get a real sense of what it looked like in times gone by with its canal moving alongside the city and well-preserved architecture and historical buildings of early modern Japan. Otaru is less built up and western than other places in Hokkaido and mostly everything is within walking distance, so in one day you can visit the suggested points of interest including:

  1. The Music Box Museum – a strange sort of mini-museum exhibiting all manners of music boxes, tinkling out well-known Disney tunes and classical music, and offering information about the development of these delicate inventions. You can buy one ready-made or ask to put together your very own one.
  2. The Steam Clock – a Big Ben-esque mini tower clock that’s powered by steam. On the hour it gives you a little whistle, which I painstakingly missed every time. Here’s a YouTube vid I found instead:
  3. Venetian Glass Shop – Otaru seems to be quite famous for its glasswork. There are a couple of glass shops featuring delicately crafted souvenirs, masks, bottles, plates and my favourite: Venetian pens made entirely of a hollow length of intricately decorated glass which you dip in ink to write with. Being around so much glass makes me really shitting nervous though, so it was a quick in-and-out for me.
  4. Sushi Resturant – it’s a port city, go figure! 12003401_10153080217551603_7747704122321250934_n
  5. Mt. Tengu Ropeway – take a cable car up Mount Tengu for a beautiful day or night view of the city. There are a few things to do at the top so I’d go earlier rather than later – I was too late to feed the chipmunks sunflower seeds. Gutted.
Make a wish! Rub the Tengu's nose for good luck.

Make a wish! Rub the Tengu’s nose for good luck.

Night views of Otaru from Mt. Tengu.

Night views of Otaru from Mt. Tengu.

There are plenty of other things to enjoy too. Beer halls, antiques shops,  markets, sake brewery to name a few. If you go during cold season it’s a magical place blanketed by snow and they have events such as the Snow Light Path festival (the name is self-explanatory).

If you ever find yourself round these parts, look up the Otarunai Backpacker’s Hostel MorinoKI. It’s quirkily decorated as I’d like my future home to be, with comfortable bamboo rounded seats and hammocks, a decking area and comfortable bunk-bed rooms. The owner is friendly and helpful, and there is a lovely dog for you to pet. And a cat but he’s an asshole.

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There’s a fox wearing denim shorts in my room.

 

During this time the Tokyo area was having a bit of a time with typhoons and general shitty weather so instead of making our way from Otaru slowly down Japan, Chris and I made a sensible decision (possibly our first) to take a cheap plane from Sapporo down to Nagoya, where we would be greeted by sun, fun, and more beer. Kampai!

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I’ve been exploring again – and wonderfully bizarre Japan did not disappoint.

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The Robot Restaurant in Shinjuku isn’t so much a restaurant as it is a full-volume-maximum-theatrics-epilepsy-inducing-cavalcade-fusion that is, in parts, accidentally hilarious. One peek at their website should give you the general gist. It’s a little pricey at 5 to 6000 Yen (an extra 1000 for a bento box dinner) but it’s worth it, and you’d be following in many famous people’s footsteps:

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Go to the Robot Restaurant and sit in a seat that was potentially previously graced by Katy Perry’s bum.

As you wait to go downstairs for the main show, you’re led into the most garish lounge I’ve ever had the pleasure of being in (think Vegas, now add more rainbow lights, and mirrors.. a little more.. bingo) while being serenaded by scantily clad robot women. You couldn’t make it up. Or, you could, and someone did, and it’s awesome.

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There’s not much more I can say about this place so here’s a compilation video I put together of the ridiculous events that unfolded:

*  *  *

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I spoke about visiting a cat cafe in this post, and how although it was quaint, the ratio of cats-to-sophie was less than satisfactory. Undeterred, I visited yet another one based in Shinjuku. I’ll let these pictures speak the thousand words I cannot:

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Greg and Fleayonce Knowles caught in the act

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Time enjoyed wasting putting hats on cats is not time wasted.

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Plotting his escape.

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For more info on this gem, see here (though I’m pretty sure we paid ¥1500 instead of the advertised ¥1000.. however there is an outside chance we accidentally bought a package deal).

I’m leaving Tokyo to explore Japan a little better in 3 days, but I still have a few more Tokyo-related posts to put together. There’s nothing like an impending deadline to get your butt into writing gear.

😹

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Well, we nearly made it to Vietnam! Except we decided to go in completely the opposite direction instead. We felt the need for some much needed tropical beach action (don’t hate me) in Sihanoukville, Cambodia. But before we got here, we got all cultured up in Phnom Penh.

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Last night my body decided it was bored of the concept of sleeping (after being partially bed-ridden for three days) and so I played a fun game of “lets see how many activities we can get through before we have to get up and be a normal human again”. Four.

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This is my best efforts using a paint application on my phone. I think it delicately highlights the fragile state of my mind at 5am in sweaty Cambodia. The dog is questionable. It might be a cat.

Although I had spent my productive night researching the Killing Fields of Phnom Penh (‘The Choeung Ek Genocidal Center’), nothing can really prepare you for the acute sense of loss, helplessness and sadness you feel whilst walking amongst the mass graves (sometimes containing up to 450 bodies). We were supplied with an audio device that talked us through the history of the Killing Fields, and even offered some brave peoples escape stories.. or inability to escape stories.. It hurts your heart.

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The grounds themselves were beautiful. Completely juxtaposed with the sequence of events that took place a few decades earlier Chickens run amok in the vegetation, a bridge over a lake (where some graves lay beneath, untouched) and sad looking trees whose boughs stretch across the water. If you haven’t already, I recommend looking up the harrowing history behind this place. People having to dig their own graves before being pushed in alive, and covered in a fatal concoction of chemicals.. Children smashed against trees and adults beaten with a spade until death (bullets were expensive).. Up to 300 people a day were marched to their death after the sounding of eerie anthem celebrating the dictatorship, played to drown out the victims’ screams.

* * *

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Another day, another sodding bus journey. Although this time we were treated to Charlie Chaplin on the inbuilt telly which had the locals (and us!) in stitches. I did that embarrassing thing where you fall asleep with your face up against the window for all neighbouring traffic to see. Apart from that, the journey was only four hours, half of what we’re used to, so it wasnt too bad.

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Sihanoukville was a laugh. We were constantly enticed into bars with the promise of a free drink

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(or 6.)

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The main thing i’ll remember about this place is you cannot lay on a sunbed for more than 1 minute without being bombarded by a myriad of asian women and children offering massages, selling bracelets.. You name it. I paid for my bracelet from a little boy with an impromptu English lesson and paid for my 5 minute massage by returning the favour to my little asian lady.

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Another thing you can have done, if you enjoy intense pain and lying in awkward positions for extended periods of time, is get your legs ‘threaded’. Essentially it’s getting your legs waxed, hair by individual sodding hair. No pain no gain, as her 5 year old daughter kindly informed me.

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We stayed in a lovely little tree house bungalow overlooking the sea with our own porch and hammock. Asides from the GIANT lizard that inhabited it with us, it was a good time.

Next stop: Vietnam.

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